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Things to Do in Tokyo - page 4

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Mori Art Museum (Mori Bijutsukan)
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Combine art and sightseeing with a visit to Mori Art Museum (Mori Bijutsukan), a prestigious Tokyo contemporary art museum. Beyond the art, take advantage of the museum's location—on the 53rd floor of Mori Tower—and its access to Tokyo City View, an indoor observation deck offering near 360-degree views of Tokyo.

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Akasaka Palace (State Guest House)
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Akasaka Palace—the only neobaroque building in Japan—was built in 1909 as the residence of the Crown Prince of Japan, but in 1975 was turned into the State Guest House. As a result, many very important international guests have stayed here and continue to do so. The central Tokyo palace is open to visitors when dignitaries aren’t in town.

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Shinjuku
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Centered around the busiest railway station in the world, the Tokyo neighborhood of Shinjuku is a thriving district full of shops and department stores, museums, bars, restaurants, and cafes abuzz with people. The neighborhood’s skyscraper district is home to some of the city’s tallest buildings.

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Kasai Rinkai Park
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Kasai Rinkai Park, Tokyo’s largest park, opened in 1989 on Tokyo Bay, a beautiful area that overlooks the water and the city beyond. Built on reclaimed land, the park was developed with conservation and preservation in mind.

The Diamond and Flowers Ferris Wheel is by far the park’s most famous site, an iconic behemoth that sits 383 feet (117 meters) tall. Any trip to the park is incomplete without the 17-minute ride on the famous structure, as the views from the top encompass all of Tokyo and the surrounding areas, including Mt Fuji on a clear day.

Also on site is the Tokyo Sealife Aquarium, which features an all-glass dome that transports visitors straight into the sea with fish and other aquatic life swimming above, around and below them. There is also the Sea Bird Sanctuary, an outdoor preserve that takes up nearly one-third of the park. Bird and nature lovers, as well as photographers, flock to the sanctuary to see local birds, and visitors are free to walk around and explore the whole area other than the protected marshes.

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Tokyo City View Observation Deck (Tokyo Sky Deck)
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In a city with many high buildings and observation decks, the Tokyo City View Observation Deck (Tokyo Sky Deck) is one of the best. It’s located on the 52nd floor of the Mori Tower, a sleek mixed-use skyscraper in Roppongi. There are three galleries with views towards different landmarks, as well as an open-air deck.

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Madame Tussauds Tokyo
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Get up close and strike a pose with famous and popular names in film, television, music, sports, history, politics, and more at Madame Tussauds Tokyo. Located at Decks Tokyo Beach in Odaiba, the Tokyo branch of the world-renowned Madame Tussauds features more than 60 life-size wax figures from around the world.

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Inokashira Park
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The pond within Inokashira Park was the first water source for the city of Edo—which today is Tokyo. One of the city’s most utilized green spaces, the park is particularly lovely during prime cherry-blossom viewing (hanami) and leaf peeping (momijigari) times. Inokashira also houses the famous Ghibli Museum, dedicated to Japanese anime.

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Edo Wonderland (Nikko Edomura)
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Step back in time to the Edo period (1603-1857), one of Japan's most intriguing eras, at Edo Wonderland (Nikko Edomura). This theme park recreates history in impressive and accurate detail with a replica Edo-period town, complete with actors in period costumes, ninja demonstrations, period-appropriate architecture and theater performances featuring courtesans and feudal lords. Visitors can eat at restaurants selling Edo-style food, rent and purchase costumes to wear in the town and buy souvenirs related to the time period.

Some of the most popular attractions in town include the Haunted Temple, decorated with spirits and demons found in Japanese folklore, and the House of Illusions, filled with trick mirrors. Kids and adults alike enjoy the Ninja Trick Maze, a challenging labyrinth, Edo Wonderland is entertaining as it is a history lesson on an era that came to define Japan.

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Happo-en Garden
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Happo-en means "beautiful from every angle." When visiting the Happo-en Garden in Tokyo, you’ll see that the name doesn’t even begin to describe this Japanese garden and teahouse.

Take a stroll through tree-lined paths of century old bonsai, cherry, and maple trees. Take in the lush gardens and budding flowers surrounding a tranquil pond. Enjoy a traditional tea-ceremony served by women in elaborate kimonos. Then, enjoy a romantic dinner at Enju or Thrush, one of the two restaurants overlooking the lovely gardens.

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Tokyo Daijingu Shrine
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The Tokyo Daijingu Shrine is one of the most important Shinto shrines in Tokyo. Worshippers come here to pray for love and a happy marriage. The shrine is dedicated to two Shinto sun goddesses and three gods of creation and growth. It was built in 1880, and is famous for being the first place to hold a traditional Shinto wedding ceremony.

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More Things to Do in Tokyo

Meiji Jingu Stadium

Meiji Jingu Stadium

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It's not the biggest or most modern baseball stadium in Tokyo, but Meiji Jingu Stadium in Shinjuku is worth visiting for its unique atmosphere and history. Opened in 1926, it's one of the few stadiums still in existence where Babe Ruth played (along with Lou Gehrig on a 1934, 22-game tour of Japan).

Today it's home to the Tokyo Yakult Swallows, as well as a popular host of many college match-ups. If you have time, it's an excellent place to watch a game. Because it is rather small nearly every seat is close to the field. Unlike in the US, Japanese baseball is a very rowdy interactive game for fans with organized chants, dancing and cheerleaders. The traditional way fans cheer for the Swallows is to open their umbrellas and sing a song, so be sure to come prepared!

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Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

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Architecture and design enthusiasts will love the Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architecture Museum. Set within Koganei Park in western Tokyo, the traditional buildings on display were moved or reconstructed here in an effort to preserve Japanese architectural history. Walk around and see how people once lived in Japan.

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Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT)

Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT)

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The Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT) opened in 1995 with the goal of researching, collecting, preserving, and displaying contemporary art from Japan and around the world. It’s the largest modern and contemporary art museum in Japan, with three floors showing temporary exhibits and two featuring artworks from the permanent collection.

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Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo Garden

Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo Garden

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In the centuries before the Edo Period, the land now occupied by Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo was known as Tsubakiyama, or Mountain of Camellias. In the beginning of the Edo Period, famous Haiku poet Matsuo Basho made his residence overlooking the property, and during the Meiji Era, former Prime Minister of Japan Aritomo Yamagata took ownership of the land and built a mansion there, which he named Chinzanso, or House of Camellias.

Today, the 710,000-square-foot (66,000-square-meter) garden sits on the grounds of the Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo. Over a dozen historical artifacts are scattered throughout, including a three-level pagoda thought to date back as early as the fourteenth century. Each season brings new sights and colors to the well-manicured garden: azaleas, cherry blossoms and irises in spring; hydrangea, crape-myrtle and fireflies in summer; migrating birds and colorful fall foliage in autumn; and in winter, plum blossoms and the famous camellias the garden is named for.

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Tokyo Solamachi

Tokyo Solamachi

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Since its completion in 2011, the Tokyo Skytree, the world’s second tallest building, has become the most visible landmark in Tokyo. At its base, you’ll find Tokyo Solamachi, the largest shopping, dining and entertainment venue in the city with more than 300 shops and restaurants.

If you want to visit the viewing gallery on the building’s 450th floor, you’ll have to book your tickets ahead of time. Once you’re back at the bottom, take some time to shop at the Solamachi mall. The shops sell a huge variety of wares, including local crafts, Japanese housewares, souvenir shops and an entire floor of cartoon and character shops.

Come hungry, because the complex has a large market, a food court and four floors of restaurants serving Japanese and global cuisine. If you’ve had enough shopping but you still need to kill some time, check out the onsite aquarium and planetariums.

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Seaside Top Observatory

Seaside Top Observatory

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The Seaside Top Observatory is the observation deck of the World Trade Center Tokyo, a towering 40-story building. The Hamamatsu-cho subway station exits directly into the building making it easy to exit, pay the ¥620 fee and hop in the elevator.

At the top you'll find a unique view of Tokyo Bay, other skyscrapers like the Tokyo Tower and Tokyo Sky Tree and even Mount Fuji on a good day. Display screens with light up buttons help you to determine exactly what you're looking at. The deck is usually not crowded so you can linger and enjoy the 360 degree views. The night view is considered particularly romantic, but keep in mind that the deck closes at 8:30.

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Jindai Botanical Gardens

Jindai Botanical Gardens

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The Jindai Botanical Gardens are the city’s oldest botanical garden, though a garden existed on the site much earlier. This especially well-designed park is divided into 30 areas, each of which is home to different varieties of the same kind of plant.

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National Museum of Western Art

National Museum of Western Art

The National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo is one of the best places in the country to see Western art. The museum building, designed by modernist architect Le Corbusier, is also a draw in and of itself. Visit to see world-renowned work of art from the 14th to the 20th centuries.

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Shinagawa Aquarium

Shinagawa Aquarium

Shinagawa is smaller than some of the aquariums in Tokyo, but it's full of interesting exhibits and is a great way to spend a few hours.

There are over 300 species of sea life divided into sea-surface and sea-floor exhibits. The centerpiece of the aquarium is a domed tunnel that winds through a massive tank, letting visitors experience full immersion while staying completely dry. The sheer amount and variety of fish is mind boggling.

Some of the best parts of the aquarium are the aquatic mammal exhibits. It's delightful to watch the animals play in the spotted seal observation building. There are also dolphin and sea lion shoes daily where you can watch the mammals jump and do tricks. Be careful though- the front rows will get soaked! If you're brave enough to sit up close you can buy a poncho to keep you dry.

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Tama Zoological Park

Tama Zoological Park

Spread out over 129 acres, Tama Zoological Park features animals free to roam in spacious, naturalistic habitats. The park, located one hour outside of Tokyo, allows travelers to observe native Japanese animals such as macaques, Sika deer and Yezo brown bears, as well as more exotic species from around the world.

The zoo is split into four major sections: the Asiatic Garden, African Garden, Australian Garden and Insectarium. Tokyo has a special relationship with its international twin area of New South Wales, so the Australia section is particularly well outfitted with koalas, kangaroos and more. Other highlights include a successful elephant breeding program and a lion bus, which allows visitors to view the lions in a safari setting.

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Sky Circus Sunshine60 Observatory

Sky Circus Sunshine60 Observatory

Sunshine 60 is a skyscraper with a 60th-floor observatory deck with a difference. The views of the surrounding city from 787 feet (240 meters) high are spectacular, and full sensory virtual-reality experiences add an extra dimension to a visit. This is an especially fun place to come with kids, or with friends.

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Tokyo SEA LIFE® Park

Tokyo SEA LIFE® Park

Tokyo SEA LIFE® Park is the largest aquarium in the city. Housed in a glass dome in Kasai Rinkai Park, it sits across the bay from Tokyo Disneyland. As it’s government-run, the exhibits lean toward educational rather than “flashy,” but it's an affordable family-friendly attraction in the busy, often expensive capital of Japan.

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Mt. Takao Cable Car

Mt. Takao Cable Car

The Mt. Takao cable car is actually a funicular railway that transports visitors halfway up the 1,965-foot (599-meter) mountain. Many visitors like to hike up—which takes about 90 minutes—but the cable car is a great alternative. On the way up, you’ll see beautiful forest, and the top of Mt. Takao affords sweeping mountain views.

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Tokyo Disneyland®

Tokyo Disneyland®

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The first Disneyland®to open outside the United States, Tokyo Disneyland®has been welcoming visitors since 1983. People can expect all of the usual magic that comes with a Disney®theme park—from Cinderella castle to the Mickey Mouse welcome—with an added dash of Japanese flavor.

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