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Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski)
Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski)

Gregory of Nin (Grgur Ninski)

Ul. kralja Tomislava 12, Split, Croatia, 21000

The Basics

As one of the city’s major landmarks, the statue is included on most city tours, which come in many forms. A close encounter with his shiny toe is a must; walking tours offer visitors a hands-on experience, while combo packages include activities such as wine tasting. Taking a tour with a local guide means that you’ll benefit from insider knowledge, while evening tours allow you to explore when crowds have dispersed and temperatures have cooled.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The iconic statue is a must-see (and rub) for first-time visitors to Split.

  • The public statue is free to view and photograph.

  • Wheelchair users can access the statue via the flat walkway on Ulica Kralja Tomislava, though be aware of the steep steps leading up to the sculpture.

  • Like many of Split’s landmarks, the Gregory of Nin statue is uncovered, so it’s worth packing a light waterproof just in case of showers.

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How to Get There

The centrally-located landmark is easily accessible on foot from anywhere in downtown Split. The area is served by several local buses, including 3,5,6,and 11, and hop-on hop-off buses, which allow you to travel between all major Split attractions at your own pace.

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When to Get There

Visit the statue early in the morning or during the late afternoon to avoid the largest crowds of toe-rubbers. Alternatively, stroll by after dark to see the statue illuminated against the atmospheric backdrop of the Old Town.

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The History of Gregory of Nin

In the 10th century, Christian services were delivered in Latin, under the direct order of the Pope. Bishop Gregory, from Nin, was a royal chancellor who directly objected to this order, believing that people needed to understand the liturgy and had to right to worship in their native language. Though he eventually lost his position due to his views, and it took a further 644 years for the cause to succeed, he is now considered a champion of Slavic languages and a national hero.

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