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Cahergall Stone Fort
Cahergall Stone Fort

Cahergall Stone Fort

Ballycarbery East, Caherciveen, Ring of Kerry

The Basics

Cahergall Stone Fort is one of the Ring of Kerry’s lesser-known sights and is often overlooked on tours of the area, though it can be incorporated into private tours with custom-made itineraries from several nearby towns such as Killarney, Kenmare, and Killorglin. Because of Cahergall Stone Fort’s proximity to Leacanabuaile Fort and Ballycarbery Castle, the three sites are frequently visited together. Steps on the fort’s internal walls allow visitors to climb up to the top level, which—on a clear day—offers views of the Atlantic Ocean and Valentia Harbour.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Cahergall Stone Fort is a must for history buffs and those traveling with children, who will enjoy running around the open ruins.

  • Bring a camera to capture images of the surrounding countryside from atop the fort’s walls.

  • Wear sturdy, waterproof shoes so you can easily navigate the uneven stone steps, even in changeable weather.

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How to Get There

The fort is situated in an area known as “over the water” by locals, about 2 miles (3 kilometers) from Cahersiveen in County Kerry. From Cahersiveen, cross over the bridge down by the Old Barracks and follow signposts for Cahergall Fort. The fort is in an isolated area not served by public transport. If you don’t have access to a car, it’s best to go as part of a tour.

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When to Get There

Cahergall Stone Fort is situated off the beaten tourist track, and the site itself is rarely busy. However, there is limited parking, and spots are snapped up quickly in summer. Arrive in the early morning or late afternoon to ensure you get a spot.

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What to See Nearby

Two other historic attractions lie in the immediate vicinity of Cahergall Stone Fort. The first, Leacanabuaile Fort, is another partially reconstructed ring fort and is just a stone’s throw away. Leacanabuaile Fort features stone walls, an underground tunnel, and the remains of ancient dwellings. Also in the area are the ruins of 16th-century Ballycarbery Castle, a crumbling, ivy-clad structure overlooking the Atlantic.

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