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Rhodes Wine Country
Rhodes Wine Country

Rhodes Wine Country

Vary by winery

The Basics

Today, Rhodes has around 7,500 acres of vineyards with two appellations (Rhodes and Muscat of Rhodes) producing a range of varietals, including native Aegean grapes like Athiri, Moschato Aspro, and Mandilaria. Many of the island’s wineries welcome visitors for tours and tastings, and guided excursions typically include stops at several traditional wineries in a single outing. It’s also possible to combine a winery tour and tasting with a visit to the island’s spectacular Butterfly Valley nature reserve or a hike to the ruined Monolithos Castle.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The town of Embonas is considered the wine capital of Rhodes, an excellent place to start your explorations.
  • Book a guided tour with included transportation to leave the driving to someone else.
  • Most wineries on Rhodes also offer olive oil and honey tastings for non drinkers.
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How to Get There

Wineries on Rhodes are scattered across the island. CAIR, the largest wine producer, is near the town of Rhodes, while many other prominent wineries are further south, near the villages of Embonas and Siana. The towns of Emery, Kounaki, and Alexandris are known for their smaller family-run wineries.

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Trip ideas

Top Beaches in Rhodes

Top Beaches in Rhodes

How to Spend 2 Days in Rhodes

How to Spend 2 Days in Rhodes

How to Spend 3 Days in Rhodes

How to Spend 3 Days in Rhodes


When to Get There

The best time to visit Rhodes wine country is during the fall harvest season, when wineries are at their most active and the village streets are filled with baskets of raisins soaking up the sun. Many wineries also host traditional dance performers during the summer high season.

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Wildcard

Souma Many wineries on Rhodes make a traditional drink, called souma, from their grapes. After the grapes are pressed, their pulp is fermented in large barrels with sea water, then boiled and distilled into a strong spirit, often with more than 40 percent alcohol by volume. Many Greek taverns serve souma as a complimentary digestif.

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