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Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre

Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre

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17 Reviews
236 W 45th St, New York City, New York, 10036

The Basics

To learn more about the many historic theaters located on and around Manhattan’s Broadway, you can book a private walking tour of the Theater District—these tours often let visitors go inside some of the venues and provide historical information about the theaters. To see a show at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, book in advance to guarantee admission and ensure you get the best price and pick of seating.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a must-visit for lovers of the theatrical arts and New York history.

  • The theater has accessible seating for visitors with disabilities: There is step-free access to the Orchestra level.

  • There is one wheelchair-accessible restroom on the main level.

  • You can purchase refreshments at the bar. Outside food and drink is not permitted.

  • Children under the age of 4 are not allowed in the building.

  • The theater does not have a dress code.

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How to Get There

Located in the heart of Manhattan’s Theater District, the Nederlander Theatre is easy to get to from anywhere in the city by public transit. Subway riders can take the A, C, or E train to 42nd Street - Port Authority, a 3-minute walk away, or the N, R, or W train to 49th Street, a 4-minute walk away.

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When to Get There

Show times vary depending on what is playing, but typically there is an evening performance on Tuesday through Saturday, a matinee performance on Sunday, and an additional matinee on Saturday. It is recommended you arrive at least 15 minutes before curtain in order to find your seats and get settled.

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Architecture of Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre

The theater was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, a prolific theater architect and designer, in what was his first independent commission—Krapp would also work on the Winter Garden Theatre and Ed Sullivan Theater (originally Hammerstein's Theater). The interior design motifs subtly reflect those of the more ornate neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts.

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