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Lima Chinatown (Barrio Chino)
Lima Chinatown (Barrio Chino)

Lima Chinatown (Barrio Chino)

Chinatown, Lima, Peru

The Basics

Barrio Chino was one of the Western Hemisphere’s earliest Chinatowns when it was founded in the mid-19th century. The community now counts 1.5 million people, representing approximately five percent of the city’s population. Explore this colorful neighborhood as part of a half- day, full-day, group or private tour incorporating visits to local food markets and learning about the ingredients and disparate cultures that go into making the flavorful “chifa” fusion cuisine.

Tours may also include visits to the major monuments of Lima’s UNESCO World Heritage-listed historic center or bohemian Barranco, before embarking on a culinary deep dive into Peru’s world-famous gastronomy. Sample local delicacies at notable eateries, and learn how to make ceviche from a local chef.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Suitable for solo travelers, couples, families especially for foodies.
  • Tours may include roundtrip hotel transfers, some food, and admission fees.
  • Wear appropriate shoes for walking, which is the best way to explore the neighborhood.
  • Chifa refers to both the fusion cuisine and the restaurants serving it.
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How to Get There

Lima Chinatown covers several blocks east of Avenida Abancay in Lima’s historic center, and is an easy walking distance from major landmarks such as Palacio de Gobierno and Plaza de Armas. The heart of Barrio Chino is a pedestrian-only block called Calle Capón, between Jiron Andahuaylas and Jiron Paruro.

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When to Get There

Lima Chinatown comes alive at night. Families traditionally come here on Sundays, so expect crowds. In general, the best time to visit Lima is wintertime (May–September), when rains are few, which is especially important if planning a trip to Cusco or Machu Picchu. The summer months (December–March) are warmer, but wetter, and in Lima especially, quite foggy.

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Wildcard

Peru’s Famous Chifa Fusion Cuisine The delicious fusion of Peruvian and Chinese cuisines—typical Chinese flavors like ginger and soy combined with classic South American foods and spices such as pineapple and aji amarillo—has been embraced all over the country, but nowhere more than in Peru’s capital city. Peruvian Chinese restaurants serve heaping portions on large plates for the entire family to share. Come on a Sunday evening, the most popular night to enjoy a chifa.

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