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Golden Roof (Goldenes Dachl)
Golden Roof (Goldenes Dachl)

Golden Roof (Goldenes Dachl)

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Herzog-Friedrich-Straße 15, Innsbruck, 6020

The Basics

Innsbruck city tours and walking tours of the Old Town typically include a photo stop at the Golden Roof. Visitors can also head inside to visit the Golden Roof Museum, which chronicles the life of Emperor Maximilian I and the history of Innsbruck and displays six of the original roof tiles (the gold tiles were replaced by copper replicas in the 20th century). Most exciting is the chance to look out over the city from the famous balcony.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • There is an admission fee for the museum; entrance is included with the Innsbruck Card.

  • Audio guides are available in multiple languages including English.

  • Visitors with children can enjoy the special kids’ stations and activities.

  • The museum and balcony are wheelchair-accessible.

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How to Get There

The Golden Roof is located on the main square along Herzog-Friedrich-Strasse in Innsbruck Old Town. It’s easy to reach the landmark on foot, just a short stroll from the Imperial Palace (Hofburg) and the Court Church (Hofkirche) or a 10-minute walk from Innsbruck train station.

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When to Get There

It’s possible to admire the Golden Roof at any time of day or night, but the museum is open daily from midmorning to late afternoon (note that it’s closed Sunday from October to April). While the summer months are busiest, another popular time to visit the Golden Roof is during the festive season, when carol singers appear on the balcony to serenade the crowds at the Christmas Market in the square below.

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History of the Golden Roof

The Neuhof was built by Archduke Friedrich IV in the early 15th century, but the 3-story, gold-topped balcony known as the Golden Roof wasn’t added until 1500. Erected in celebration of Hapsburg emperor Maximilian I and his second marriage, to Bianca Maria Sforza of Milan, legend has it that the lavish addition was also a strategic move—built to confound rumors that the imperial family was running out of money. Beneath the sparkling rooftop, intricately carved wooden reliefs and frescoes painted on to the balcony show the emperor’s many coats of arms and his likeness alongside that of both his wives.

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