Recent Searches
Clear

COVID-19: Check local travel restrictions and learn what we're doing to help keep you safe and your plans flexible. Learn more.

Read More

Things to Do in Catalonia - page 2

Category

Gaudí Experience (Gaudí Experiencia)
star-5
25
3 Tours and Activities

Though you can get to known Barcelona’s favorite son, Antoni Gaudí, by seeing the sights, you’ll really get a better understanding of the artist by exploring his fantastical world at the Gaudí Experience. This is where you can learn more about the architect via large interactive boards (available in nine languages, no less), and especially by watching the 4D movie, which is what really makes the experience a proper experience.

An experience, indeed, as the movie involves more than just pretty visuals but also moving seats and even other sensory details such as mist. During the adventure, you’ll travel the streets of old Barcelona, exploring Gaudí’s creations and his dreamlike world. Narration-free, it’s an especially ideal way for kids to get a more entertaining look at one of the most intriguing sides of Barcelona.

Read More
Montjuïc Mountain
star-4.5
90
5 Tours and Activities

Montjuïc is the hill situated on the southwestern border of Barcelona. The name of the hill translates to "Mountain of the Jews," which refers to the Jewish cemetery and possible settlement there at one time. Home to Barcelona's World Exhibition in 1929 and then the 1992 Olympics, Montjuïc has been developed to include a number of attractions, including museums, theatres and clubs. An old castle still stands on the hill as well, dating back to days when political prisoners were executed en masse by the Spanish government.

Popular attractions include the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya and CaixaForum, both of which house interesting collections of art, ranging from medieval to modern. Other famous points of interest are the Poble Espanyol - Spanish Village - and Joan Miro museum. Come nightfall, find people from all over the city perched on ledges to watch the spectacle that is La Font Magica show, a colorful water display in the main fountain that is set to music.

Read More
Casa Lleó i Morera
38 Tours and Activities

One of the trio of striking buildings that make up the ‘Illa de la Discordia’ along Barcelona’s famous Passeig de Gràcia, Casa Lleo i Morera stands proudly beside Gaudí’s iconic Casa Batlló and Josep Puig i Cadafalch’s equally eye-catching Casa Amatller. Elaborately restored in 1902 by architect Lluis Domènech i Muntaner, whose other works include the magnificent Palau de la Música Catalana and the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Casa Lleó i Morera was built in 1864 and takes its name from its original owners, the Morera family.

Finally opening its doors to the public in 2014, visitors can now explore the spectacular modernist interiors of Casa Lleó i Morera. Along with the distinctive ornamental façade, highlights of the building include exquisite stained-glass windows, a series of sculptures by Eusebi Arnau, colorful mosaics by artists like Mario Maragliano and Lluís Bru i Salelles and exquisite furnishings, handcrafted by cabinetmaker Gaspar Homar.

Read More
Casa Amatller
33 Tours and Activities

Though Passeig de Gràcia is most famously known for Gaudi-designed masterpieces La Pedrera and Casa Batlló, there’s another curious building to discover here: Casa Amatller. Constructed in the late 19th century, the former home was constructed for its namesake, chocolatier Antoni Amatller, and is just the place to go to see spectacular Modernisme architecture, and minus all the crowds.

Like its neighboring buildings along Passeig de Gràcia’s famous Block of Discord, or Illa de la Discordia, Casa Amatller also mixes things up architecturally, featuring both Flemish and Catalan styles. A visit to its interior is equally impressive, promising exquisitely tiled walls and floors, colorful stained-glass detailing, and rooms decorated with the original furniture.

Read More
El Born Cultural and Memorial Centre (El Born Centre de Cultura i Memòria)
star-5
4
35 Tours and Activities

The elegant Mercat de Born in La Ribera was a complex iron-and-glass structure built by Josep Fontserè in 1876 on top of the 18th-century ruins of Barcelona’s former district of Vilanova de Mar. Closed nearly 45 years ago, the market has now been granted new life as the El Born Centre Cultural, a center curating exhibitions on Barcelona’s history and celebrating three centuries of Catalan identity.

Inside the former market hall are excavations dating from the War of Spanish Succession between King Philip V of Spain and Archduke Charles of Austria. This took place in the early years of the 18th century and culminated in the year-long siege of Barcelona, which was won on Aug. 30, 1714, by Philip V and his Bourbon allies. The date is still celebrated today as the National Day of Catalonia.

Read More
Santa Caterina Market (Mercat de Santa Caterina)
star-4
4
25 Tours and Activities

Santa Caterina was the first covered market in the city of Barcelona. Since being completely renovated in 2005 with a modern design and colorful, curved rooftop, it has become a celebrated sight in Barcelona. Yet, it stays true to its traditional Catalan market roots. Over 325,000 ceramic pieces were used by architects Benedetta Tagliabue and Enric Miralles to create the kaleidoscope roof, with more than fifty different shades of colors representing the fruits and vegetables sold within. The mosaics recall the Modernista style of architecture Gaudi made famous across the city.

The market sells every type of quality produce and meat imaginable, including fresh pastries and breads. It’s a great place to pick up or simply view the colorful fruit, vegetable and flower stands, along with local meats and fish. Once you’re done browsing the stalls, check out the remains of the 15th century Espai Santa Caterina, the Gothic church the market was built on top of.

Read More
Els Quatre Gats
11 Tours and Activities

Tucked down a side street in Barcelona’s Barrio Gotico (Gothic District), Els Quatre Gats (meaning ‘The Four Cats’, or ‘a few people’ in Catalan slang) is one of the city’s most famous bar-restaurants and a memorable location to sample some delicious traditional Catalan cuisine. The Parisian-style tavern was the brainchild of local businessman Pere Romeu, taking its inspiration from Paris’ atmospheric cabaret bar, Le Chat Noir (The Black Cat), and creating a bohemian ambiance that immediately resonated with the city’s artists and writers. Opening its doors in 1897, Els Quatre Gats quickly amassed a number of legendary patrons, becoming the favorite haunt of Picasso, who held his first 2 exhibitions in the main dining room, and a popular meeting point for revered architect Gaudi.

Read More
Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA)
star-4.5
50
22 Tours and Activities

A soaring, shimmering glass and concrete edifice in the Raval, Barcelona’s Museum of Contemporary Art was designed by US architect Richard Meier and completed in 1995, spearheading the once-tatty district’s revival. Its matt-white interior is flooded with natural light and creates the perfect backdrop for the museum’s 5,000 paintings, sculptures, images and conceptual pieces, which are shown in ever-changing temporary exhibitions running for between three and six months. Featuring avant-garde artists from the latter half of the 20th century, the collection is rich in international names such as Paul Klee, Dieter Roth and Jean-Michel Basquiat – among many others – but specializes in the works of celebrated Catalan artists including Antoni Tàpies, Miquel Barcelò, Susana Solano and Pere Jaume. The museum also has a library, a well-stocked bookshop and café as well as Saturday morning workshops for families visiting with young kids.

Read More
National Art Museum of Catalonia (Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya)
46 Tours and Activities

Housed in the Palau Nacional (National Palace of Montjuic), the National Art Museum of Catalonia (Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya or MNAC) boasts one of the most spectacular locations in Barcelona, fronted by the dazzling Magic Fountain and overlooked by the towering Montjuic Mountain and Castle. The impressive Neo-Baroque building was designed by Catalan architect Josep Puig i Cadalfach for the legendary 1929 International Exhibition and first hosted the National Art Museum in 1934. One of the city’s most iconic structures, the palace’s majestic façade, exquisite Modernista furnishings and glittering chandeliers are as breathtaking as the art displayed within and a popular tourist attraction in itself.

Today, the MNAC is Catalonia’s largest museum with some 260,000 works and home to the world’s most important collection of Romanesque Art, alongside a wide selection of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque masterpieces.

Read More
Camp Nou
star-4.5
44
38 Tours and Activities

Football fans won’t want to miss a visit to the Camp Nou Football Stadium, the home ground of FC Barcelona and the largest stadium in Europe. Inaugurated in 1957, the venue has hosted a number of key international games, including the FIFA World Cup, the European Champions’ Cup and two UEFA Champions League Finals.

During your tour of the 55,000-square-meter stadium, designed by architects Francesc Mitjans, Josep Soteras, and Lorenzo García-Barbón, you'll walk through the players’ tunnel and across the pitch. You’ll also get to visit the Chapel, the TV room, the Press Room, the Sports Medicine Center, the Fundacio Zone, team locker rooms and the luxury Presidential Box. End your visit at the FC Barcelona Museum and have your picture taken with the European Champions Cup.

Read More

More Things to Do in Catalonia

Sant Pau Recinte Modernista

Sant Pau Recinte Modernista

star-4
6
22 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Joan Miró Museum (Fundació Joan Miró)

Joan Miró Museum (Fundació Joan Miró)

star-4.5
186
13 Tours and Activities
The works of Joan Miró, one of Barcelona's most famous 20th century artists, are displayed in this building in the Parc de Montjuïc. The gallery itself is a piece of modern art, its design incorporating terraces and interior courtyards to direct the flow of visitors and give the space an open air feel. Over 14,000 pieces of Miró's works are displayed here on a rotating basis, including everything from raw sketches to sculptures and coming from various periods in the artist's career. Most popular are the works made in his signature "childlike" style of bold shapes and bright colors. Never committing himself to a specific art movement, Miró dabbled in Surrealism and Expressionism as well as experimented with various types of media.
Learn More
Spanish Village (Poble Espanyol)

Spanish Village (Poble Espanyol)

15 Tours and Activities

One of the most famous points of interest on Montjuïc is the Poble Espanyol. The so-called "Spanish Village" was built for the 1929 International Exhibition to show off models of the architecture specific to each region in Spain.

Visitors ambling through the mixed-and-matched village will find themselves one minute walking down a street characteristic of the Basque region, and the next, standing before a home reminiscent of the Andalucian style. Also included are copies of Galician and Castilian architecture and, of course, Catalan dwellings.

Filling these buildings are various craft shops left over from the International Exhibition that are still churning out keepsake crafts. There are also several bars, cafes and shops throughout to quench every thirst, appetite and need for a souvenir.

Learn More
History Museum of Catalonia (Museu d'Historia de Catalunya)

History Museum of Catalonia (Museu d'Historia de Catalunya)

star-4.5
46
5 Tours and Activities

As the capital of Catalunya, Barcelona is the center of the region’s history; and there is no better place to take it all in than the History Museum of Catalonia. Catalonia has long struggled with preserving its culture and independence, and this museum seeks to raise awareness about the heritage and identity of the Catalan people.

In-depth interactive exhibits focus on the development of Catalonia from prehistory through the growth of various industries to present day. The exhibits focused on the Spanish Civil War and Franco’s rule are particularly well done. The museum explains the occupation of the region throughout the years by the Romans, the Moors, and others — each leaving their own mark on the culture. In addition to the permanent collection, there are consistently good temporary exhibitions as well as a library, restaurant, and open-air rooftop. The museum is housed in the Palau de Mar, which has a history and significance of its own.

Learn More
Royal Monastery of St. Mary of Pedralbes (Monestir de Pedralbes)

Royal Monastery of St. Mary of Pedralbes (Monestir de Pedralbes)

4 Tours and Activities

The oldest building in the city’s grand Pedralbes quarter, dating back to 1326, the church and monastery of Monestir de Pedralbes is now a museum and remains one of the city’s most stunning examples of religious architecture. Named for its characteristic white stones (pedres albes), the complex is acclaimed for its Catalan Gothic style, featuring a central courtyard garden, herb garden and fountain. The monastery, which once housed the nuns of the Franciscan Order of Saint Clare, was commissioned by the wife of James II of Aragon, Queen Elisenda, who famously took up residence in the monastery after her husband’s death.

Those interested in uncovering some of Barcelona’s rich religious history will find wandering the museum of the Monestir de Pedralbes an enlightening experience, devoted to showcasing the lives of the nuns who served in the building during the 14th century.

Learn More
Botanical Garden of Barcelona

Botanical Garden of Barcelona

star-5
1
2 Tours and Activities

Showcasing the plant life of six different Mediterranean climate areas and the Canary Island, the Botanical Garden of Barcelona allows for a trip around the world in one place. Vegetation from Australia, South Africa, Chile, and California over 14 hectares make this one of the city’s biggest parks, and a great place to escape the hectic energy of urban life. The Mediterranean theme allows for a closer comparisons of plants growing in a similar climate worldwide.

The park works to preserve a diverse collection plant species, of which there are over 1,500. There is a fascinating sensory garden which emphasizes touch and smell, as well as a collection of medicinal plants. A wide paved path allows for a leisurely stroll through the different sections. Those interested in local plant life will enjoy the orchard consisting of typical Catalan vegetables.

Learn More
Montjuic Park (Parc de Montjuïc)

Montjuic Park (Parc de Montjuïc)

star-4.5
92
78 Tours and Activities

Overlooking the southwestern portion of Barcelona, Parc de Montjuic is the city’s green hilltop getaway that is packed with both history and a host of sights. Indeed, it is there that you’ll find the Jewish Cemetery, after which it is believed that the “Mountain of the Jews” is named. Montjuic is also the site of its namesake castle, a military fortress dating back to the 17th century.

But it’s the last century that has brought particular interest to Montjuic: first there was the International Exhibition in 1929, and then the Olympics in 1992. Both of these affairs contributed to the urbanization of this elevated land, and as a result you can expect to find a slew of related sites. These include the water-show-style Magic Fountain, which sits in front of The Palau Nacional, now home to the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya. And then there’s also the Poble Espanyol, a replica of Spanish villages and their various architectural styles.

Learn More
Las Ramblas

Las Ramblas

star-4.5
1469
152 Tours and Activities

Las Ramblas, a series of 5 stretches of road that run through central Barcelona, is known collectively just as La Rambla. It's name comes from a stream (raml in Arabic) that used to run along the same path before the land was developed in the 14th century. Now in place of the stream is a 3/4 mi (1.2 km) street with a wide, tree-lined pedestrian boulevard down the middle. Along the path are numerous shops, cafes and bars as well as some interesting attractions.

Both the Wax - Cera and Erotica museums are situated on La Rambla as are the Grand Opera House - Gran Teatre de Liceu - and the city's most colorful market, Mercat de la Boqueria. A large mosaic by Joan Miro is another iconic piece that warrants at least a second look, if not a photo opportunity. La Rambla is filled day and night with snap-happy tourists as well as locals so there is never a dull moment to be had. No Barcelona experience is complete without a stroll down this boulevard.

Learn More
Placa del Rei

Placa del Rei

star-5
1
111 Tours and Activities

The noble heart of Barcelona’s Old Town, tucked beneath the Roman walls that once ringed the ancient city, the Plaça del Rei is the city’s best preserved medieval square, home to a cluster of grand buildings. Largely celebrated as the most significant remainder of Barcelona’s medieval past, the square now exists as an unofficial open-air museum of fine gothic architecture, with many of the buildings open to the public for viewing.

Once home to the counts of Barcelona and the Kings of Aragon, the 14th century Palau Reial Major, or the Royal Mayor Palace, dominates the square, including the Watchtower of King Martí and the exquisite Salo del Tinell, a Gothic banqueting hall which backs onto the picturesque Palau Reial Gardens. The Plaça del Rei is also home to the Palau del Lloctinent, or Lieutenant’s Palace, where the Archive of the Crown of Aragon is housed and the 14th-century royal chapel of Santa Àgata, most famous for housing Jaume Huguet’s Contestable altarpiece.

Learn More
St. James Square (Plaça de Sant Jaume)

St. James Square (Plaça de Sant Jaume)

star-4.5
26
72 Tours and Activities

As the site of the former Roman Forum, Plaça Sant Jaume used to be the center of the old Roman city of Barcino. Originally quite a bit smaller, the large square, which is situated in the Gothic quarter, was partially filled by its namesake church along with its cemetery and other buildings. These days, however, the expansive, cobbled plaza is known as the political center of the city.

Indeed, on one side you’ll set your eyes on the headquarters of local government, City Hall, which features a grand façade that dates back to the late 1800s, and whose interior can be visited once a week on Sundays. Opposite City Hall is the Palau de la Generalitat de Catalunya, the seat of the Catalan government, and from where 100 presidents have governed. It too is open for visits, but only guided ones, which take place the second and fourth weekend of every month.

Learn More
Güell Palace (Palau Güell)

Güell Palace (Palau Güell)

43 Tours and Activities

Before La Pedrera, before Parc Güell, and certainly before the still-under-construction La Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi conjured up a mansion called Palau Güell. This palatial home was built in the 1880s for one of Gaudi’s main benefactors, Eusebi Güell. The goal was to accommodate the wealthy industrialist’s private and social life, and, after you explore the home, it’s not hard to imagine that Gaudi must have lived up to the task.

Acclaimed for the innovative use of space and light, the Modernist palace is especially loved for its main hall, formed by a parabolic arch design, and which comes complete with a star-pricked ceiling (an illusion created by holes in the roof) and sneak-peek windows from which residents above spied on newly arrived guests below. Given its lower entrance fee (with included audio tour) — as compared to other Gaudi sights — and convenient old town location in El Raval, it makes a worthy addition to any Barcelona sightseeing itinerary.

Learn More
Picasso Museum (Museu Picasso)

Picasso Museum (Museu Picasso)

star-4.5
371
42 Tours and Activities

The Picasso Museum (Museu Picasso), located in El Raval district, is Barcelona's most visited museum and occupies a medieval mansion that's worth a look for the architecture alone. But inside lay the greatest treasures - the works of Pablo Picasso. The artist had a strong connection to Barcelona, living in and studying mostly in the Ciutat Vella neighborhood from 1895-1904.

The Picasso Museum - or Museu Picasso - is divided into various periods of the artist's career, starting chronologically with his earliest sketches and self-portraits then progressing on to his moody Blue period and ending with his study of Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez.

Pieces are displayed to give each one adequate attention but with over 3,800 paintings the exhibit is by no means sparse.

Learn More